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5 Questions in 5 Minutes with Riveters forward Kaycie Anderson

Kaycie Anderson scored four of her seven pro goals against the Riveters, so they went out and signed her this summer. why’d she leave Connecticut and more below!

Kate Frese

After five seasons in the NWHL/PHF with the Connecticut Whale, forward Kaycie Anderson decided to take her talents a little further east to join the Metropolitan Riveters in New Jersey for her sixth season as a professional. After a ridiculously successful collegiate career at Norwich University (118 points in 118 games is kind of good), the 31-year-old Anderson has had to battle for playing time and she’s been an excellent teammate in Connecticut, but it was time for a new challenge.

She recorded 18 points (7g-11a) in 61 games for the Whale, and this past season was one of their alternate captains. *Of note: four of her seven pro goals have come against the Riveters. Her best season came during the league’s longest season to date - Season 5 - when she appeared in all 24 games and posted 11 points/eight assists and helped the Whale secure their first playoff win in four years.

Anderson has shown throughout her tenure at this level, she can pop in the occasional goal and definitely still has her wheels to get around defenders. This season, the Riveters, who completely retooled their roster this off-season (again) are hoping she can cause some havoc against their opponents during Season 8 in the PHF.

Recently, I was able to catch up with the Maple Plain, Minnesota native on the ice following a press event at the Rivs new home rink to ask her five questions in five minutes - and here’s how it went!

The Ice Garden: How excited for your sixth season in the league?

Kaycie Anderson: I’m very excited. After just a few practices this week I can already feel how special this group is, and how well we all really meshed out there on the ice. It’s going to be a lot of fun for sure.

TIG: What led to your decision to leave the Whale for the Rivs this season after five years there?

KA: I definitely loved my time with Connecticut and I’ll always be a Whale at heart and played for them for a long time. But I’ve also been pretty good friends with Kendall Cornine, Madison Packer and Babs for some years now; I played with Kelly Babstock on the Whale.

Actually, the new GM of the Riveters - Tori Charron - was my college roommate at Norwich University. So I already had a connection with her and one day we were talking and she asked if I’d like to come over and play here in New Jersey. I said sure! I’m excited for a change and I have (former Connecticut teammates Catherine) Crawley and Taylor (Marchin) here with me now, too.”

TIG: So was that all coordinated or a big surprise?

KA: I was talking with them, asking what they were up to, what their thoughts were (on the next season). I know Taylor had played for (Team President) Digit (Murphy) in China, so they had that connection. When I reached out to see what she was doing Taylor says: I’m playing for the Rivs, and I was like, so am I! We’re all really excited to be here.

Michelle Jay

TIG: Sounds like this is best case scenario for you - a new team yes, but lots of familiar faces or enough for it not to be weird, right?

KA: It’s definitely nice to have the familiar faces, and to be on the same team as Cornine and Packer - who I’ve played against for many years now. We’ve all been friends off the ice but never on the same team together. It’s also exciting having such a large group of new people on this team - only three returners and many new people to the league. So it gives you a fresh perspective, and there’s a new coach paired with Ivo (Mocek) and his experience. Venla has brought a lot of new stuff and it’s exciting.

TIG: So what are your first impressions of your new Head Coach Venla Hovi?

KA: I love her coaching style so far, she’s very organized and we go through everything ahead of time. We have our focus for that day and I think it helps the team really understand our mission for that day and the habits we are working to create. It’s only been three or four days, but we’ve built upon each day of practice that way.